Ross McElwee
United States, 114 min

Everything begins and ends with family, observes Ross McElwee at the end of a film in which he copes with the death of his father and his grandmother, but also the birth of his son Adrian. The filmmaker has experienced at first hand the finiteness of the body and the relentless chain of deaths and regenerations at the basis of human existence.

Everything begins and ends with family, observes Ross McElwee at the end of a film in which he copes with the death of his father and his grandmother, but also the birth of his son Adrian. The film deals with time and its implications, including those relative to making films. The filmmaker has experienced at first hand the finiteness of the body and the relentless chain of deaths and regenerations at the basis of human existence. Through his brother, who became a doctor like his father, McElwee directs a stern gaze onto the limits of the human body and its fragility. Cinema becomes connected with this fragility and explores how it can possibly hold back the advancement of time. The film’s title derives from a conversation with a Jehovah’s Witness who mentions that a “time indefinite” may exist, quoting the Bible. By means of a circular structure, the film reconnects life, cinema, and affections.

Giona A. Nazzaro

Duration
114 min
Year
1993
Country
United States
Section
Atelier Ross McElwee
Language
English
Subtitle
French
Production
Ross McElwee

Atelier Ross McElwee

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